Lesson Plan: Grade 2 – Math, Sorting and Classifying

Rationale: Student will learn to describe, sort and classify 2D shapes.

Learning Goals:

  • Students will sort shapes by colour, size and number of sides
  • Students will describe why a 2D shape belongs to a sorting and classifying group
  • Students will describe why a 2D shape doesn’t belong to a sorting and classifying group
  • Students will use appropriate vocabulary

Success Criteria:

  • I can use appropriate vocabulary to describe 2D shapes (colour, size, number of sides)
  • I can describe why a shape belongs to a sorting and classifying group
  • I can describe why a shape doesn’t belong to a sorting and classifying group
  • I can group 2D shapes based on their attributes (colour, size and number of sides)

Assessment:

  • Students are being assessed as learning through conversation of created groupings based on 2D shape attributes. It is a formative assessment providing feedback to the instructor to ensure that students have an understanding of 2D shapes.
  • Have students use the given website to practice what they have learned in the lesson. Provide a timer for 10 minutes to explore the game. Let students know that they will be expected to provide one of their answers through a sticky note (as an exit ticket), iBrainstorm or verbal recording (choosing their preference). They will be asked to explain their thinking in regards to their sorting and classifying strategies/choices. Students can then post sticky on anchor chart that will be displayed in math section of classroom.

Materials:

  • Chart paper
  • iPads
  • Geometric shapes
  • Sticky notes
  • Pen/pencil

Introduction:

  • Upon entering the class, students will be given a geometric shape
  • Students will be expected to sort and classify themselves into groups by looking for similar and different attributes
  • Once students are in table groups, they will record (either verbally in voicenote, through iBrainstorm or writing it on a piece of paper) their groups attributes

Activity:

  • As a group the teacher will present four shapes, three that fit a rule and one that doesn’t, and prompt students to determine which shape does not belong, and which do. The students will be asked to (1) identify the rule; (2) why the shapes belong; (3) why the shape doesn’t belong. The teacher will repeat this process 2-3 times.
  • Students will be grouped into pairs and will receive a variety of shapes. They will be instructed to think of a sorting rule, having at least three shapes that fit the rule and one that does not. Taking turns, one student from the pair creates a sorting rule, and the other student classifying the rule, explaining why they belong and why the other one doesn’t. A timer will be displayed on the smartboard allocating a time of 3:00-5:00 minutes based on observation (“on your fingers how many more minutes do you need to complete the task?”). If students are able to figure out the rule before the timer ends, they will repeat the activity using a new rule.
  • Ask students to share the strategies they used to group shapes. What attributes did they use to sort and classify the shapes? Ask groups if they would like to share one of their rules.

Consolidation:

  • Data Shapes:- https://nrich.maths.org/7523
  • Have students use the given website to practice what they have learned in the lesson. Provide a timer for 10 minutes to explore the game. This activity allows for students to practice sorting and classifying 2D shapes based on their attributes. It also helps students recognize the similarities and differences among shapes. Let students know they will be expected to provide one of their answers through a sticky note or iBrainstorm (choosing their preference). They will be asked to explain their thinking in regards to their sorting and classifying strategies/ choices. Students can then post sticky on anchor chart that will be hung in math section of classroom or take a screenshot on iBrainstorm of their sticky note and airdrop it to the teacher. This activity will assist in consolidating the knowledge of the students and gives the teacher concrete evidence on how the students are doing.

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