Grading Guidelines

Report card grades cannot summarize all learning that has occurred in a subject, which is why it is important to ensure that report card grades represent the trend in student’s achievement. The following guidelines will help you derive grades that closely represent what the students have learned.

  • Report card grades cannot include all the data you have collected. Assessment for learning data is for instructional purposes only. Report card grades should be based on assessment of learning data, the marks students receive for polished work that has been improved through practice and feedback.
  • Report card grades on a balance of students work. The sample should include oral, written and performance tasks, completed over a period of time.
  • Report card grades should capture the trend in a student’s achievement over time. This is not determined by calculating the average. Many boards now require that grades be derived from the mode, with special consideration given to more recent evidence.
  • Report card grades and anecdotal comments should complement each other and provide a consistent picture of students’ strengths and needs.
  • Report card grades and anecdotal comments should complement each other and provide a consistent picture of students’ strengths and needs.
  • You must be confident that you can stand behind the grades. This confidence comes from, standards that have been shared, well maintained records, an understanding that students and parents have the right to appeal.
  • Report card grades should be based on the most important learning that has occurred, not on the components that are easiest to mark
  • For special needs and ELL students, report cards must represent fair judgment about students’ strengths and needs, taking into consideration modifications and information from the IEP.
  • Achievement and LSWH are reported separately.
  • Assessment data used for report card grades must be demonstrated independently and not influenced by the work of other students may or may not have done in collaborative learning situations.

Let’s Talk About Assessment
Damien Cooper

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